Accessibility Articles/journals

(In)accessible events

Wanted to book tickets for a concert. After some browsing on the website of the venue, I finally find a section where it says the venue is ‘wheelchair accessible, and there’s ‘a separate platform for wheelchair users in the concert hall’. It states that I should e-mail for inquiries about tickets (no possibility to book wheelchair tickets through the regular ticketing service).
I send an e-mail asking whether there is indeed a separate wheelchair platform in the (otherwise all standing) concert hall, and if so, how I can obtain tickets.
I get a reply that I have to e-mail the concert organisor, which I promptly do.

Nothing.

After a week. I inquire again.

I then receive an e-mail that unfortunately there is no wheelchair platform in the concert hall. šŸ˜•

Bummer.

The same day, I receive an e-mail that – correction – there IS a wheelchair platform in the concert hall, and that I can book tickets with them directly.
I booked and paid the tickets (still to receive) and am already holding my breath about the accessiblility of the venue and whether there will actually be a platform ā€¦ šŸ¤”

Upper right corner: Photo of concert, taking from in the public, looking at the stage. Manu hands, arms in the air. Bright lights on stage.

Down left corner: drawing of person on wheelchair with open arms and one leg stretched out.

Tags read: #accessibility
#inclusion
[ID incl]

āž”āž” Unfortunately many cultural events are held in spaces that are not/hardly accessible.
A venue or event is NOT accessible when one has to depend on the goodwill of staff to open side or back doors and entries, or escort you through all different (sometimes locked) rooms of the venue to get at your place. When one has to ring a certain telephone number or push a special button upon arrival to ‘get help’ which then takes half an hour to arrive. Accessible means you can get there independently, or with the help of your assistant.
Plus, the information about the acessibility (in announcements, on website) is often lacking and one has to inquire again, and again, and again ā€¦

āž”āž” Please make your event accessible, and provide information about the acessibility.

Geertrui Cazaux (Trudi). Vegan. Gardener. Wife. Disabled. Writer. Activist. Caretaker. Ex-academic. Drummer. Ā°1970. Belgium. Vegetarian since mid '90's and vegan since 2010. My main motive has always been the ethical perspective, although I am also inspired by the environmental and health aspects. Writing about veganism, animal rights and ableism on Graswortels.org, Brugesvegan.com, and CripHumanimal.org

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